The NT Greek and Bible Programs Seminars


The NT Greek and Bible Programs Seminars

Saturday, July 12, 2014

10:00 am to 5:00 PM

 

At the home of Hector and Meiling Avelino!!!

16024 SW 65 Terrace

Miami, FL 33193

 

If you need information on how to get to Meiling’s home the day of the seminar please phone me @ 305.299.0633

 

If you are attending or thinking of attending please read carefully through all the information and print the supplements at the end of this blog entry.

 

This seminar is being graciously hosted by Hector and Meiling Avelino. Thank you Hector and Meiling!

 

Meiling will provide us with cold cuts for lunch!

 

 

John 8: 32 And you shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free.

When we know the truth of the Bible in its accuracy, it will set us free.

 

The truth will not set us free if we believe it in error.  We are set free through revelation knowledge.

Nothing is as effective in the revelation of the scriptures as the original language of Greek.

 

Here is what you will learn!

 

  1. This exciting NT Greek seminar will teach you the fundamentals of the Greek verb tenses, voices, and moods, plus the noun cases.
  2.  Secondly, we will will teach you how to use the Online Strong’s Concordance, the second most important book in the world.
  3. The seminar will be combined with three outstanding free Bible programs which you will download and which you will learn to use effectively with your knowledge of the NT Greek.
  4. We will teach also you how to use the Verb TVM (Tense, Voice and Mood) Coded System on the Online Bible.
  5. We will teach you how to use the Grammatical Parsing System of the Interlinear Scripture Analyzer.
  6. We will teach you how to use E Sword and add to it from the most extensive free library of Bible resources on the internet @ Biblesupport.com

 

 We strongly encourage you to bring your computers, for we will use them.

If you do not have a computer please do come. All the information which will be covered can be utilized without a computer.

 

For sake of time and the unavailability of the internet at Hector and Meiling’s with many people, I am going to request you to please download the following programs prior to attending!

 Here are the links for you to download.

If you run into problems with the downloads please Face Book me prior to the seminar.

 

 

Online Bible Program

Download unto your desktop

 

Program Starter Pack (Unicode Version)

 

http://onlinebible.net/downloads/program

 

 

Interlinear Scripture Analyzer

Download unto your desktop

 

“ISA basic v2.1.5”

 

http://www.scripture4all.org/download/downloadcontrol/dc2.php?dcid=22609487

 

 

E Sword

Download unto your desktop

 

E Sword V 10.3.0 Install ( not the update )

 

http://www.e-sword.net/downloads.html

 

 

E Sword Module Installer

Please download to your desktop.

 

E-Sword Module Installer 0.4: Updated

 

You need to open a free account with Bible Support in order to download the E Sword Module Installer

 

http://www.biblesupport.com/e-sword-downloads/file/6917-e-sword-module-installer-04-updated/

 

 

Once again, this seminar is being graciously hosted by Meiling Avelino. Thank you Hector and Meiling!

She will provide us with cold cuts for lunch.

We will take one hour for lunch.

 

The cost of the seminar is $10.00 payable in cash or made out to “Emerging, Inc.” if you are using a check.

Please bring the money with you the day of the seminar.

**If you have a financial hardship case and cannot afford the $10.00 please contact me. I am much more interested in you leaning the Word of God than in your $10.00. Many blessings

 

If you need information on how to get to Meiling’s home the day of the seminar please phone me @ 305.299.0633

 

There will be no child care. Sorry.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Please print the following supplements before coming to the seminar.

 

 

Supplement One

 

VERBS

In the Greek, verb tenses are most focused on action.

The action can be described as one of the following three.

 

1) Continuous (or ‘Progressive’) action.

2) Completed (or ‘Accomplished) action, with continuing and even eternal results.

3) Simple occurrence, without the notion of progress.

(This is sometimes referred to as ‘punctiliar’ action or a photograph on history’s timeline.

 

Punctiliar:                         Action that relates to a specific point in time. The photographic tense

Linear:                                Action that is in the progress of occurring

Perfected:                         Action that is both punctiliar and linear in nature. It can refer to action relating to a point in time, yet has results are in the progress of occurring, and can be eternal.

 

 

VERB TENSES

Present Tense

The present tense denotes a continuous kind of action. It displays action in progress and or in state of perseverance.

 

Imperfect

The imperfect tense demonstrates constant or linear action just like the present tense, but in the past. It always indicates an action constantly or repeatedly occurring in past time. It portrays the action as going on for some extended period of time in the past.

 

Aorist

The aorist is said to be a “simple incident, event or happening” without regard for the amount of time taken to accomplish the action. This tense is also referred to as the ‘punctiliar’ tense. I call it a photographic snapshot on history’s time line.

In the indicative mood the aorist tense represents action that occurred in the past time, often translated like the English simple past tense.

 

Future

Just like the English future tense, the Greek future tells about an anticipated action or a certain happening that will occur at some time in the future.

 

Perfect

The perfect tense is a combination of the aorist and present tense. It denotes a simple action occurring in the past, but with continuing results in the present, future and maybe for eternity.

 

Participles

A participle is regarded as a “verbal adjective”. It is frequently a word that ends with an “-ing” in English (such as “speaking,” “having,” or “seeing”).

It can be used as an adjective, in that it can modify a noun (or substitute as a noun), or it can be used as an adverb to further explain or define the action of a verb.

 

Infinitives

The Greek infinitive is the form of the verb that is usually translated into English with the word “to” attached to it, often used to complement another verb.

It can be used to function as a noun and is therefore referred to as a “verbal noun”.

 

 

VERBAL VOICES

Grammatical voices in the Greek indicate whether the subject is the performer of the action of the verb (active voice), or the subject is the recipient or receiver of the action (passive voice).

 

Active Voice

If the subject of or in the sentence is performing the action, then the verb is referred to as being in the active voice.

 

Passive Voice

If the subject of the sentence is being acted upon, then the verb is referred to as being in the passive voice.

 

Middle Voice

The Greek middle voice shows the subject acting in his own interest or on his own behalf, or participating in the results of the verbal action. The subject in the middle voice performs the action, so it’s reflexive in the sense that he performs the action to benefit himself, or back upon himself

 

 

VERBAL MOODS

The feature of the grammatical “mood” of a verb has to do with the statement’s relationship to reality.

The mood deals with the fact of whether the declared statement is actual or if there is only the possibility of its actual happening.

The indicative mood is the only mood conceived of as actual while with the other three moods (imperative, subjunctive, and optative) the action is only thought of as possible or potential.

We will not deal with the optative mood in this seminar, for its occurrences are relatively rare in the NT Greek.

 

Indicative Mood

The indicative mood is a statement of fact or an actual occurrence from the writer’s or speaker’s perspective.

Even if the writer is lying, he may state the action as if it is a fact, and thus the verb would be in the indicative mood.

it may be action occurring in past, present, or future time.

When used in the indicative mood, the present tense denotes action taking place or going on in the present time.

 

Imperative Mood

The imperative mood is a command or instruction given to the hearer, commanding the hearer to carry out or perform a certain action.

 

Subjunctive Mood

The subjunctive mood indicates probability or objective possibility. The action of the verb will possibly happen, depending on certain objective factors or circumstances, or on a person’s free will.

It is oftentimes used in conditional statements (i.e. ‘If…then…’ clauses) or in purpose clauses.

However if the subjunctive mood is used in a purpose or result clause, then the action should not be thought of as a possible result, but should be viewed as a definite outcome that will happen as a result of another stated action.

Every verb therefore has the three components of tense, voice and mood, affectionately termed, (T.V.M)

 

NOUNS

 

NOUN CASES

The term “case” refers to what is called substantives. These are nouns and pronouns and adjectives (including participles).

The cases categorize their association to other elements in the sentence.

Noun cases are formed by putting the ‘stem’ of the noun with an ‘ending’.

The case form is shown by the ending of the word.

There are five different case forms in Greek.

The five cases are Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative and Vocative.

 

Nominative Case

A noun or pronoun that is the relationship of the subject of the sentence is always in the nominative case.

 

Genitive Case

The genitive is most often viewed as the case of possession.

In more technical terms one noun in the genitive case helps to qualify another noun by showing its “class” or “kind”.

The genitive case has more uses than most other cases, but in general a noun in the genitive case helps to limit the scope of another noun by indicating its “kind” or “class”.

 

Dative Case

The dative is the case of the indirect object, or may also indicate the means by which something is done, or the sphere or location of its origin.

It is used most often in one of three general classes: Indirect object, Instrument (means), or Location (in the sphere of.)

Most commonly it is used as the indirect object of a sentence.

It may also indicate the means by which something is done or accomplished; instrumental

Used as a dative of location, it can show the “place”, “time”, or “sphere” in which something may happen.

 

Accusative Case

This case is aptly described by its name.

It is the case the points the finger towards something, like one who has been accused. It defines the final objective, consummation or the goal of something.

The accusative case is the case of the direct object, receiving the action of the verb.

Like the other cases, the accusative has a wide variety of uses, but its main function is as the direct object of a transitive verb.

The direct object will most often be in the accusative case.

 

Vocative Case

The vocative is the case of direct address. It is used when one person is speaking to another, calling out or saying their name, or generally addressing them.

 

 

Supplement Two

 

Numbering system for Verb Tenses for the Online Bible Program including TVM (Tense, Voice, Mood). Please print for the seminar. I am not including the pluperfect tense. This is why some numbers are missing.

 

Aorist 5600 -5686

 

Future 5687- 5706

 

Imperfect 5707 -5713

 

Present 5719- 5753

 

Perfect 5754- 5772

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