How To Become Ultimately Free?


2Co 12:2  I know a man in Christ who fourteen years ago–whether in the body I do not know, or whether out of the body I do not know, God knows–such a one was caught up to the third heaven.

Romans 6:7  For he that is dead is freed from sin.

What does a dead person do?

He is free from sin.
He is delivered
He is free from sickness.
He is free from his past.
He is free from his old identity.
He is not susceptible to rejection.
The corpse is the freest person on earth.

 
Rule of engagement!

The devil does not mess around with a corpse for too long, does he?

Have you ever had an enemy?

God gave me a vision of Jesus dying on the cross.

Surrounding Him were hundreds of Roman soldiers with menacing spears in their hands.

Sometime during my vision Jesus dies.

A little while later, the soldiers begin to realize that the Lord had deceased.

One by one they left the scene of the crucifixion, their threatening spears no more.

 

Jesus is dead. Let’s go home!

As long as one is alive, the enemy feels threatened and might attack.

Once the person dies, the enemy has nothing that threatens him and departs.

He gets bored with a corpse.

 

 So what about you and me?

The Bible says that the Christian died with Christ on His cross. She is not dying, she is dead. If you are still dying, the devil and sickness will attack you. If you are dead they will leave you. You must know that you are dead with and in Christ!

The genius of God’s plan through Christ is that true freedom comes through death and not by trying be good. Only a corpse is truly free. Christ is the only so called religious leader who offers freedom through death.

Tell me, which other religion offers you this? But many get offended with Christ, because in reality they don’t want to pay the price of absolute freedom which can only come through death.
The biggest problem that Christians have is that we think that we are alive, when we are dead.
coffin_by_shadowthehedgehog33-d56wpe1

Advertisements

Dont Judge A Book By Its Cover


Don’t Judge a Book By Its Cover.

 

Nyack, is a weather related town.

When it’s warm and sunny everybody is in the streets.

When it’s cold and clammy you have to go to into the Starbucks.

A few days ago, it was sunny and warm, and the gazebo are was teeming with people.

My eye caught a woman sitting on a park bench by herself.

She was well dressed and appeared happy and comfortable.

I wasn’t sure if I had met her on a previous trip, but something about her seemed vaguely familiar.

“Excuse me, have I met you before, I am just not sure,” I said.

“No, I don’t think we’ve ever met,” she said.

Mary sat with her and initiated a conversation.

She was of Central America decent, but had lived in Nyack many years.

Her life appeared well enough put together, so we were not expecting her next comments.

One month earlier, her son, daughter in law, and their son, which was the woman’s grandson, were involved in a horrific car accident. The son and his wife were badly hurt and were hospitalized. The driver of the other car and her precious four year old grandson both died.

One month before that, the same daughter in law had miscarried.

Her two grandchildren were now dead one month apart.

Mary, who has the loving compassion of Jesus flowing through her, bowed her head and prayed beautifully for what seemed ten minutes

The woman had her eyes closed all the time.

The Spirit of God moved mightily over upon her.

When the prayer ended, wiping tears from her eyes, the woman could not stop saying how much the prayer had ministered to her.

At that moment her friend came and she was gone.

Everybody, has a story of pain and suffering.

It’s so powerful when Jesus engages and heals the pain, not only in the church, but more so, on the streets.

Don’t judge a book by its cover, for though it might be bright and cheery, its pages might be difficult to read by the tears which have stained their ink.

 Image

 

 

On This Mother’s Day: The Necrotic Womb


Eph 4:31  Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice:

Bitterness is rooted in the “me”, in the “I’.

As long as there is an “I” in you to protect, the propensity for bitterness is there.

Bitterness wells up in the wounded heart.

God created Adam and Eve with sweetened spirits.

At the moment of Adam’s disobedience the seeds of bitterness were disseminated.

What if Adam felt remorse for how he blew it and blamed Eve for proposing the eating of the forbidden fruit?

If he felt slighted and betrayed by his wife, his heart was wounded.

What were once the sweet waters in his spirit were now polluted with the dregs of hate and anger towards his wife.

Ex 15:23  And when they came to Marah, they could not drink of the waters of Marah, for they were bitter: therefore the name of it was called Marah.

Eph 4:31  Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice:

A wrathful heart, anger, evil speaking, and ill intent are the external outflows of internal bitterness.

As long as there is a “ME” to protect and vindicate, there is bitterness.

As long as there is a “ME” that has been hurt and must take vengeance there is bitterness.

Jesus Christ was brilliant in how he dealt with sin. Well, of course, He is God.

But for a believer who is not a Christian believer, and the agnostic and atheist who do not believe, they must acknowledge that Christ’s cure for bitterness is ingenious.

The solution is death.

The only one who is not susceptible to bitterness is a corpse.

A cadaver cannot be bitter, because she no pain.

 Rom 8:3  For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:

Jesus Christ is the one historical figure who dealt a fatal blow to bitterness by condemning it to death.

Death is the only answer to obliterating the old so that the new can arise.

 Rom 6:4  Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead (  nekroo – corpse ) by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

As long as something is not completely dead, the completely new cannot emerge.

Resurrection is the privilege of the dead.

As long as something lives, resurrection cannot come.

This is why God, through Christ, performs His greatest works through corpses and corpse like circumstances.

Ro 4:19  And being not weak in faith, he considered not his own body now dead, when he was about an hundred years old, neither yet the deadness ( nekrosis) of Sara’s womb:

Sarah bore a child at ninety-nine from a necrotic womb.

Wow!  That is amazing.

Isaac, the child of promise, Christianity’s forerunner who would receive from God by faith and not works, was conceived in a necrotic womb.

This word “nekrosis” appears once in the Bible.

If resurrection is God’s central plan for humanity, it can only come out of necrotic conditions

Moses was called by God at eighty to deliver Israel, when had surrendered to being a career sheep herder.  He had lost his vision to deliver the Jews forty years earlier.  Necrosis

David had been summoned by God as king of Israel, but only ascended to the throne after no less than ten assassination attempts by Saul. Necrosis.

Joseph dreamed of his eleven brother’s bowing down to him at sixteen. He was thrown into an Egyptian dungeon at seventeen, got out at thirty, and became the Pharaoh’s right hand man. His brothers did bow to him, but thirteen years later! Necrosis.

Humanity spends trillions to perfume, cosmeticize, pamper and exalt the one thing which God already condemned to necrosis in Christ, that is, sin.

Humanity rejects the One who condemned to destruction that which enslaves it, while embraces the very enslaving thing; sin.

Freedom from bitterness is found in death. Since bitterness is the result of a hostile assault through pain, or rejection, it’s intertwined with the “ME”, the “I”, in the individual’s identity.

A bitter person has great difficulty in separating fact from fiction because bitterness is who she is.

Gal 2:20  I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.

Buy praise be to God!  Christ has also dealt with the “ME”.  To the one in Christ, and who died with Him, her “I” no longer lives.

The “I” is now Christ living in her. Her “ME” is Christ, and her “I” is Christ’s identity, and not that of bitterness.

Col 3:1  If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God.

2  Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth.

3  For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God.

4  When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory.

My life is Christ. The “I” is Christ. The “ME” is Christ.

In Christ, there is no pain, no bitterness, simply an endless type of life to corruption.

Phillip 1:21  For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.

Heb 11:11  Through faith also Sara herself received strength to conceive seed, and was delivered of a child when she was past age ( beyond the season of her prime), because she judged him faithful who had promised.

Remember that Sarah bore the child who was the forerunner to Christianity at ninety-nine from a necrotic womb.

Image

On This Mother’s Day: The Necrotic Womb


Eph 4:31  Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice:

Bitterness is rooted in the “me”, in the “I’.

As long as there is an “I” in you to protect, the propensity for bitterness is there.

Bitterness wells up in the wounded heart.

God created Adam and Eve with sweetened spirits.

At the moment of Adam’s disobedience the seeds of bitterness were disseminated.

What if Adam felt remorse for how he blew it and blamed Eve for proposing the eating of the forbidden fruit?

If he felt slighted and betrayed by his wife, his heart was wounded.

What were once the sweet waters in his spirit were now polluted with the dregs of hate and anger towards his wife.

Ex 15:23  And when they came to Marah, they could not drink of the waters of Marah, for they were bitter: therefore the name of it was called Marah.

Eph 4:31  Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice:

A wrathful heart, anger, evil speaking, and ill intent are the external outflows of internal bitterness.

As long as there is a “ME” to protect and vindicate, there is bitterness.

As long as there is a “ME” that has been hurt and must take vengeance there is bitterness.

Jesus Christ was brilliant in how he dealt with sin. Well, of course, He is God.

But for a believer who is not a Christian believer, and the agnostic and atheist who do not believe, they must acknowledge that Christ’s cure for bitterness is ingenious.

The solution is death.

The only one who is not susceptible to bitterness is a corpse.

A cadaver cannot be bitter, because she no pain.

 Rom 8:3  For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:

Jesus Christ is the one historical figure who dealt a fatal blow to bitterness by condemning it to death.

Death is the only answer to obliterating the old so that the new can arise.

 Rom 6:4  Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead (  nekroo – corpse ) by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.

As long as something is not completely dead, the completely new cannot emerge.

Resurrection is the privilege of the dead.

As long as something lives, resurrection cannot come.

This is why God, through Christ, performs His greatest works through corpses and corpse like circumstances.

Ro 4:19  And being not weak in faith, he considered not his own body now dead, when he was about an hundred years old, neither yet the deadness ( nekrosis) of Sara’s womb:

Sarah bore a child at ninety-nine from a necrotic womb.

Wow!  That is amazing.

Isaac, the child of promise, Christianity’s forerunner who would receive from God by faith and not works, was conceived in a necrotic womb.

This word “nekrosis” appears once in the Bible.

If resurrection is God’s central plan for humanity, it can only come out of necrotic conditions

Moses was called by God at eighty to deliver Israel, when had surrendered to being a career sheep herder.  He had lost his vision to deliver the Jews forty years earlier.  Necrosis

David had been summoned by God as king of Israel, but only ascended to the throne after no less than ten assassination attempts by Saul. Necrosis.

Joseph dreamed of his eleven brother’s bowing down to him at sixteen. He was thrown into an Egyptian dungeon at seventeen, got out at thirty, and became the Pharaoh’s right hand man. His brothers did bow to him, but thirteen years later! Necrosis.

Humanity spends trillions to perfume, cosmeticize, pamper and exalt the one thing which God already condemned to necrosis in Christ, that is, sin.

Humanity rejects the One who condemned to destruction that which enslaves it, while embraces the very enslaving thing; sin.

Freedom from bitterness is found in death. Since bitterness is the result of a hostile assault through pain, or rejection, it’s intertwined with the “ME”, the “I”, in the individual’s identity.

A bitter person has great difficulty in separating fact from fiction because bitterness is who she is.

Gal 2:20  I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me.

Buy praise be to God!  Christ has also dealt with the “ME”.  To the one in Christ, and who died with Him, her “I” no longer lives.

The “I” is now Christ living in her. Her “ME” is Christ, and her “I” is Christ’s identity, and not that of bitterness.

Col 3:1  If ye then be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God.

2  Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth.

3  For ye are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God.

4  When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory.

My life is Christ. The “I” is Christ. The “ME” is Christ.

In Christ, there is no pain, no bitterness, simply an endless type of life to corruption.

Phillip 1:21  For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.

Heb 11:11  Through faith also Sara herself received strength to conceive seed, and was delivered of a child when she was past age ( beyond the season of her prime), because she judged him faithful who had promised.

Remember that Sarah bore the child who was the forerunner to Christianity at ninety-nine from a necrotic womb.

Image

Rob Bell, Love Wins, And The Body Of This Death!


 Rom 7: 24  O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?

The explanation of “the body of this death” by Greek NT expositor and scholar, Marvin Vincent, is absolutely brilliant.

The body serving as the seat of the death into which the soul is sunk through the power of sin. The body is the literal body, regarded as the principal instrument which sin uses to enslave and destroy the soul. In explaining this much-disputed phrase, it must be noted:

1. That Paul associates the dominion and energy of sin prominently with the body, though not as if sin were inherent in and inseparable from the body.

2. That he represents the service of sin through the body as associated with, identified with, tending to, resulting in, death. And therefore,

3. That he may properly speak of the literal body as a body of death – this death, which is the certain issue of the abject captivity to sin.

4. That Paul is not expressing a desire to escape from the body, and therefore for death. Meyer paraphrases correctly: “Who shall deliver me out of bondage under the law of sin into moral freedom, in which my body shall no longer serve as the seat of this shameful death?”

5. Ignatius, in his letter to the Smyrnaeans, speaks of one who denies Christ’s humanity, as “Nekroophoros” one who carries a corpse.

Nekroo is a corpse. Phero is to bear something.

Bible expositor John Gill says this about body of this death.  “And is to him like that punishment Mezentius inflicted on criminals, by fastening a living body to a putrid carcass.”

The evil tyrant Mezentius forced a criminal to be tied face to face to a copse  (nekroo) until such man died from the effects of bearing and contacting the putrefying body.

Paul compares the sinful nature of mankind without Christ to the body of this death.

In fact, every human being without Christ carts a face to face chained “body of this death” . The rotting body of sin incessantly whispers sinful pleasures and habits to this one  until he goes to the grave.

Only Christ and His work on the cross  can unchain a loved one from this horror.

Rob Bell erroneously says in his book “Love Wins”, that because God is love, ultimately no one will go to, or stay in hell.

My apologia to Pastor Bell is that heaven or hell is not just an issue of love winning.

Could or would God allow people who are bearing a putrid corpse of the sinful nature chained face to face to them into His heaven? Heaven indeed would be a funny place.

Everybody alive at the etching of these words has opportunity to be freed of this corpse through Christ.  Why should God do it later in hell for them?  Or do I want to risk my eternity on Mr. Bell’s presupposition?